The Job Interview: How to Handle the Interview as a “Seasoned Professional”

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unemployment7The Jobs Report for the month of August was published last Friday, and America’s Employment Rolls aren’t exactly burgeoning, to say the least.

According to CNSnews.com,

A record 92,269,000 Americans 16 and older did not participate in the labor force in August, as the labor force participation rate matched a 36-year low of 62.8 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The labor force participation rate has been as low as 62.8 percent in six of the last twelve months, but prior to last October had not fallen that low since 1978.

BLS employment statistics are based on the civilian noninstitutional population, which consists of all people 16 or older who were not in the military or an institution such as a prison, mental hospital or nursing home.

As one of the over 92 million Americans mentioned in the BLS report, well into my fifth month of “fun-cation” as First Lady Michelle Obama once described unemployment, I am reminded of the University Graduation Speech given by Thonton Melon (the late, great Rodney Dangerfield) in the movie “Back to School”,

Thank you, Dean Martin, President Sinclair…and members of the graduating class. I have only one thing to say to you today…it’s a jungle out there.You gotta look out for number one. But don’t step in number two. And so, to all you graduates…as you go out into the world my advice to you is…don’t go! It’s rough out there.Move back with your parents. Let them worry about it.

Unfortunately, as a 55 year old “Seasoned Professional”, my parents are no longer here for me to move back in with. Besides that, my wife wouldn’t let me.

With the national unemployment rate as high as it is, it is becoming harder and harder for “Seasoned Professionals”, such as myself, to find gainful employment  While extensive work experience can certainly work to the advantage of a job seeker,  it definitely seems that, in this technology-driven job market, fresh and trainable young candidates are considered to be more valuable by corporations.

If you are a job seeker with over 15 years of job experience, you must  prove to an interviewer that you have relevant experience, as well as the adaptability and passion that they value in younger candidates.  Recruitips.com has posted a few interview tips for older job seekers.(The tips are theirs. The analysis and any smart alack remarks that may pop up are mine.)

1.    Show that you are current.

Interviewers are looking for a candidate with particular relevant work experience.  Make sure that you are familiar with current trends in your profession, so that you can “wow” the Interviewer as to how knowledgeable you are.

Yes, the knowledge you’ve gained through your extensive work experience is important, but, if you drone on about it to the Interviewer, they will likely get that same “eyes glazed-over” expression that your kid used to, when you told him/her that you had to walk to and from school 5 miles each way, uphill both ways, in blinding snow.

2.    Demonstrate adaptability.

Unfortunately, there are recruiters out there who perceive us “Seasoned Professionals” as “set in our ways”…untrainable and unadaptable. Be prepared to give your Interviewer a few examples of times when you were required to adapt to a new professional environment, and you found success afterward.

3.    Show off your network.

You’ve no doubt heard it said that “It’s not what you know. It’s who you know.” Having an impressive network of business acquaintances can be a powerful arrow to have in your quiver to pull out during your interview.

Just don’t pull a Jon Lovitz, “Yeah…my wife…Morgan Fairchild. That’s the ticket!”

4.    Prove that you have an understanding of technology.

A knowledge of Social Media and Web-Based business tools can put you in the “catbird seat”. It will show the Interviewer that, just because you are a “Seasoned Professional, does not mean that you are “computer-illiterate”,

5.    Be honest about your health.

According to the law, your health problems are none of the Interviewer’s concern. However, do not let your alligator mouth overload your hummingbird hindquarters.Simply put, don’t say that you can do something, if you know that your health will not allow you to do it.  You won’t be helping yourself or your potential employer.

Personally, I used to have a 56 inch chest and 18 inch biceps…but, that’s all behind me, now.

Calvin Coolidge, Jr. was the 30th President of the United States. A Republican lawyer from Vermont, Coolidge worked his way up the ladder of Massachusetts state politics, eventually becoming governor of that state. His response to the Boston Police Strike of 1919 thrust him into the national spotlight and gave him a reputation as a man of decisive action.

He was known as “Silent Cal”, because he was a man who chose his words carefully. However, when he spoke, his words resounded with clarity and conciseness. When he was asked what the secret of success was, he responded:

Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan press on has solved and will always solve the problems of the human race.

I hope the tips I have shared will help you gain meaningful employment,

Never quit. Never surrender.

-Allen

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