Passion: Ya Got it?

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th2Y1T40FNThe only way to do great work is to love what you do. – Steve Jobs

What the late entrepreneurial genius, Steve Jobs, was talking about, is PASSION.

According to finance.yahoo.com,

Seventy percent of students would prefer a stable job without a high level of emotional investment or passion over a job with lots of passion but no job security, according to the most recent Way to Work™ survey from Adecco Staffing USA, the nation’s leading provider of recruitment and workforce solutions. The survey also found that while the majority (79 percent) of students are optimistic they will find a job in five months or less, finding a job is still their top concern.

 

Adecco conducted the survey of 1,001 Millennial and Generation Z students as part of its Way to Work™ program, which helps prepare students and recent graduates for internships and job opportunities. Members of ‘Gen Z’ surveyed, who are between the ages of 18-20, appear to already have differences in their priorities and concerns compared to their Millennial counterparts.

“We’re on the cusp of a new era,” said Joyce Russell, president, Adecco Staffing, USA. “With the first group of ‘Gen Z’ now in college, it will be fascinating to learn how this new generation of the labor force differs from Millennials in terms of their aspirations, outlook, expectations and priorities.”

It appears that these young Americans are more concerned about surviving than they are about thriving.

The American Worker who simply punches in and punches out at his stale, old job, day after day, is not just a well-known stereotype…it’s an all-too-common reality.

A lot of Americans seem to feel the way that those Millennials do, seeing a job as just something they do, not something they love to do.

And, that’s sad.

Speaking as a “business veteran”, folks who feel that way do not seem to  understand that fact that, as working adults, we spend 80% of our time on the job, and only 20% pursuing leisure activities and family time.

Plus, they never excel at their positions.

That’s a whole lot of time to perform the duties of a job which is boring you out of your mind, when you would rather be doing something else.

No matter how diligently you are performing your duties, quite frankly, you are still cheating your employer, because he is not getting the best that you can give him.

Curt Rosengren, in an article posted on money.usnews.com, said the following about the difference that having passion about your job makes:

It’s an energy source. When you’re on fire about what you do, it energizes you, and you can put that energy back into your work. Instead of the energy drain that work represents for so many people, your work actually becomes an energy gain. So not only are you getting energy from what you’re doing, you also aren’t having to dig into your energy reserves just to get through the day. The energy differential is huge.

It helps you feel more confident. For far too many people, work is about getting up in the morning and trying to be someone they’re not. Not only does that drain their energy, it also keeps them off balance. Think of someone standing on one leg with the other leg up in the air and their arms waving, trying to keep their balance. They’re deathly afraid that someone is going to come up and bump into them, because they’re already in danger of falling over. Trying to be who you’re not in your career is a little like that. You have to put extra effort into doing what doesn’t come naturally. Maintaining the façade keeps you off balance.

When you’re aligned with what energizes you, on the other hand, it’s like having both feet solidly planted on the floor and your center of gravity low. You don’t have to worry about somebody knocking you off balance because it doesn’t take an special energy to simply be who you are. You inherently feel more confident about what you’re doing.

It feeds your persistence. The odds are good that, whatever your career path, you’re going to run into roadblocks and experience some bumps along the way. When you’re doing something in pursuit of what energizes and inspires you, those roadblocks and bumps are a lot easier to take. Don’t get me wrong. They never become enjoyable, but their size relative to your objective is smaller.

I was at an Intercontinental Hotel Group “Solution Selling Seminar” last week, where a top executive at IHG asked us if we had passion about our job.

Passion is important in the Hospitality Industry. If you don’t have it, when you go to meet a potential client, they will spot your lack of it from a mile away. So will the guests staying at your hotel.

Whether you are a executive, a mid-level manager, a recent college graduate working in an entry-level position, or a ditch digger, if you don’t have passion about what you are doing during the time that you spend at work, then you are cheating your employer and yourself.

Life is too short…and you’re too smart to remain a hamster on a treadmill, going nowhere fast.

It takes passion to accomplish your goals.

Ya got it?

Allen Fitzhugh is Director of Sales at Candlewood Suites-Memphis. He can be reached at dos@cwsmemphis.com.

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Okay. You’ve Been Hired. Now What?

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hired1052014If you’ve ever seen the look on somebody’s face the day they finally get a job, I’ve had some experience with this, they look like they could fly. And its not about the paycheck, it’s about respect, it’s about looking in the mirror and knowing that you’ve done something valuable with your day. And if one person could start to feel this way, and then another person, and then another person, soon all these other problems may not seem so impossible. You don’t really know how much you can do until you, stand up and decide to try. – Kevin Kline, “Dave” 1993

Those of you who have read my blog for any length of time, and, by the way, thank you for that, know that I have spent the past 5 months in search of meaningful employment.

Last Wednesday, my search ended, as I was hired for the position of Sales Manager at Candlewood Suites-Memphis.

When the shock wore off, I said to myself,

Okay, Self. What now? How do I handle myself on the first day at my new job?

Being the analytical type of person that I am, I decided to go to the World Wide Web to find the answers to that question, which I would like to share with you.

Here are some tips from Holly Paul, PricewaterhouseCooper’s U.S. recruiting leader, courtesy of usnews.money.com. ( The list of methods is the author’s. The analysis and any smart alack remarks which may pop up are mine.)

1. Time your arrival on the first day.

Paul suggests: “Arrive early, but not too early, to demonstrate responsibility and passion.”

Just like you arrived at job interviews 15 minutes early, in order to give a good first impression, that’s a good idea for your first day on your new job too.

Getting there early allows you to get yourself together before you take off on your new adventure.

2. Think about your wardrobe.

Take out what you want to wear on your first day, the night before.

Of course, by this time you should know what the dress rules are for the office.

Dress professionally and always dress in good taste.

Your appearance says a lot about you. Dress to impress, not to “shock and awe”.

3. Step up your company research.

Since you landed the job, you probably already conducted some due diligence, and you have a basic knowledge of what the company is about and what their core values are. Since you are about to be working there, it would be a good idea to review the company’s website once more, in order to learn about its mission, lines of business, and culture from the viewpoint of an employee.

Additionally, there may be some LinkedIn and Facebook groups for employees and some professional groups your co-workers may go to.

This is a great way to network and to keep up with what is going on in your field..

4. Practice introducing yourself.

I know that it sounds corny, but direct eye contact and a firm handshake will demonstrate the you are a go-getter with self-confidence.

Remember how smooth you were in your job interview? Carry that same suave demeanor and stylish professionalism into your new position and you will do well.

Just don’t be like Tim Matheson in “Animal House”:

I’m Otter…Rush Chairman…D@#n glad to meet you!

5. Ask questions.

…Not just because you are expected to.

The best questions will show that you are genuinely interested in learning the daily procedures involved with your new position.

Just don’t be like my 6 year-old grandson…

Why?Why?Why?Why?Why?Why? (I kid.)

6. Show what you know.

Look for ways to professionally “show off” your skills and knowledge.

Be humble. Approach the situation like, “Have you ever tried…?”

7. Communicate professionally.

Don’t speak to your new boss, like you do to the guys you watching football with on the weekends. be mindful of your diction. Enunciate clearly, but do not speak in a stilted manner, like “Joshua”, the computer from the 1983 movie, “WarGames”.

Greetings, Professor Falken. Shall we play a game?

8. Share your passions.

The best part of who you are, as a professional, includes knowing and being able to articulate who you are and what’s important to you, in other words, your values and passions.

While you are sharing your values and passions, your boss just might share theirs with you, as well, enabling you both to know where each other is coming from.

9. Hone those listening skills.

One of the skills which I have had during my professional career, is the ability to listen to clients and interpret what they want from what they say, what they don’t say, and what they imply.

It takes practice to sharpen this skill, but, it will prove invaluable to you, as you strive for a successful career.

Can you hear me now?

10. Take notes.

I used to work at a company where all of the vice-presidents (the owner’s sons) kept a writing journal on their desks. Just a cheap composition book. However, it proved invaluable to them when need arose to remember what happened in the past, in order to move forward into a more profitable future. It also helped when there was a disagreement at to how a certain situation occurred.

Additionally, taking notes helps you to stay organized and keep up with the small details that might escape your memory.

Because no boss wants to hear…

I forgot.

In conclusion, if you are unemployed, and I could give you one piece of advice on landing a job, I would refer you to this profound advice, given by the man known to our nation as “Silent Cal”, because he measured his words very carefully. However, when he opened his mouth, his words spoke volumes…

Nothing in the world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan press on has solved and will always solve the problems of the human race. – Calvin Coolidge,  30th President of the United States of America

Never give up. Never surrender.

-Allen